Daryl Dubpernell Dickman, BLS’67

Dee (Daryl Dubpernell) was born on February 18, 1943, in Watertown, CT, and passed away on July 7, 2011. Dee married Mike Dickman, PhD’68, in 1962, and in 1965 they moved to Canada to attend UBC. They lived on campus in a plywood row house on Mustang Avenue, originally constructed for soldiers returning to Canada after WWII. Dee was used to roughing it and was always the optimist. She graduated at the top of her class in library science and was offered a job as a librarian at UBC’s Sedgewick Library. This started Dee on a long and rewarding journey of helping students — something she did for 47 years as a university librarian at UBC, Carleton University and Brock University. Dee’s two sons, Sven and Tim, were encouraged to learn French to attend French immersion schools in St. Catharines, ON. In 1988, Dee spent many days at the Port Dalhousie rowing basin watching Sven practice and compete at the Royal Canadian Henley Regatta, where he and his coxed 8 team won a silver and three gold medals. In 2006 Tim moved to Vancouver to take a job at the Storyeum Museum in Gastown. Storyeum was a live, interactive, educational creation of British Columbia’s history through special effects, actors and actresses in a 65-minute show. Dee loved the picture of Tim wheeling a nine-metre-long, life-size model of a Triceratops down Water Street in front of the Storyeum. Dee’s sister, Robbie, one of two twins some 13 years older than Dee, drove with Dee to Detroit to visit their father, an electroplating chemist who had recently donated his life’s acquisitions on the history of metal plating, to Wayne State University. The Wayne State chief librarian thanked him in a formal awards ceremony at the University that Dee and Robbie attended. In St. Catharines, Dee was an active member of PENS and LACAC in St. Catherines, ON, which involved her in local planning and heritage issues respectively. In August 2009, Dee began chemotherapy treatment with Prochlorperazine and Dexamethasone. On July 7, 2011, Dee died of lung cancer. On July 13, Pond Inlet at Brock University was filled with her friends and colleagues, who came to remember her. Her enlarged picture was hung on the wall, together with the following words: For nearly 35 years, Dee Dickman provided research support to Brock faculty and students in a variety of areas including history, Canadian studies, Classics, Education and Applied Language Studies. Always keen to learn and mentor, she thoroughly enjoyed working with students. She will be fondly remembered by her colleagues for her enthusiasm, positive disposition and desire to help others.

Dee is survived by her two sons, Sven and Tim, and grandchildren Angele and Esteban.

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