George C. Shaw, BASc’51

shaw-georgeGeorge Charles Shaw, born April 20, 1926, in Winnipeg, died June 18, 2014, of complications from kidney stones, at his home in Halifax. His two daughters, Andrea and Cathy, son Matthew, and family, friends, and funny, kind caregivers were at his side. He was predeceased by his wife, Christina, in 1997. George put himself through UBC with odd jobs, including some modelling in newspaper adds, for which he was teased mercilessly. His post‑war career at Alcan in Montreal, Halifax and Toronto was followed by an MBA at the CEI in Geneva, joining Alcan colleagues who, with their wives, became life‑long friends. His career was spent mainly in engineering and management consulting, undertaking Canadian and international projects. George performed many volunteer and community leadership roles, chairing the Halifax Assistance Fund to inaugurate pre‑school breakfast programs, and helping engineers escaping the Czech uprising to find work in Canada. Blessed with a rare blood type, he was called to donate at odd hours, always returning with the story of the person his blood would help. He is missed by his four grandchildren, Christina, Julia, Phoebe and Wyatt, nephew Bill Cooper of Vancouver, niece Dorothy MacCulloch of Bedford, NS, and nephew John Burkart of California. In 2002, George was revived from a sudden cardiac arrest. This, and subsequent surgery, inspired him to fight the frailty of old age on cardio machines and mini‑trampolines. At the Dalhousie Dalplex, he was cheered on by the swim teams and daycare crowds alike. “Go, George, go!” chanted the toddlers. He ate 10 servings of vegetables and fruits, including a bowl of Nova Scotian blueberries, every day. George took up painting at 80 and worked joyfully until the end to create and promote his watercolours, which are now in collections across Canada.

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