1960s

Ray Grigg, BA’61, DLitt’02, has released his tenth publication, The EcoTrilogy, a selection from his more than 750 environmental columns over the past 16 years. Covering a breadth of topics – mostly philosophical in Ecologos, mostly psychological in Ecopathy, and mostly biophysical in Ecocide – the 64 chapters per book are informative and carefully footnoted for additional reading, but the collective effect is to underscore the complexity of our environmental challenge. In this regard, The EcoTrilogy is a realistic assessment of our situation, neither hopefully optimistic nor ominously pessimistic. The message in the books is implicitly clear: that we are racing against time with very little margin for error. The EcoTrilogy is available from the author at www.raygrigg.com or at bookstores in Campbell River, the Comox Valley, and Quadra Island, where he lives on a lovely ten-acre property with Joyce Baker, BMus’69.


Members of the Rehab Medicine Class of ’68
Members of the Rehab Medicine Class of ’68

Penny Douglass, BSc’68, reports that a group of class- and room-mates from the Rehab Medicine class of 1968 recently gathered to share the 50th anniversary of their graduation. Image (top right): L-R Lyndsay (Thomson) Fukushima, Penny (Rofe) Douglass, Joanne Stan, Dorothy (Shives) Genge, Donna (Bishop) Prelypchan, Janey (Brasell) Cole-Morgan.


Ron Smith
Ron Smith

In 2017, Ron Smith’s, BA’69, DLitt’02, latest book, The Defiant Mind: Living Inside a Stroke (Ronsdale Press), was long-listed for the BC Book Awards’ George Ryga Award for Social Awareness in Literature and won the IPPY gold medal in autobiography and memoir from USA’s Independent Publisher. The Defiant Mind, originally published in 2016, offers a first‑person account of Smith’s journey through a debilitating stroke. With acuity and humour, Smith chronicles his process of recuperation – the challenges of communication, the barriers to treatment, the frustrations of being misunderstood and written‑off, the role of memory in recovering identity, the power of continuing therapy, and the passionate will to live. Stricken by partial paralysis and limited to typing with only two fingers, Smith’s writing process lasted 18 months. His goal, above all, was to deliver a message of hope: that life can go on, even after what he calls a “carpet bombing of the brain.”

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