Kate E. McInturff, MA’95, PHD’00

Kate McInturffKate McInturff of Ottawa, age 49, died peacefully at home on July 27, 2018, following a three‑year battle with colon cancer. Born in Seattle, Washington, in 1968, Kate graduated with a bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington and a master’s and PhD from UBC. After serving as an instructor at the American University of Cairo (Egypt) and assistant professor at McMaster University, she moved to the University of Ottawa and in 2007 became a Canadian citizen. Kate subsequently worked at Peacebuild, the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action, and Amnesty International, then served for five years as a senior researcher at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). While at CCPA, she served on the United Nations Advisory Group on Inequalities and the Coordinating Committee of Social Watch.

Reflecting her lifelong passion for women’s rights and gender equality, Kate achieved national acclaim for researching, writing, and producing CCPA’s annual report, The Best and Worst Places to be a Woman in Canada (policyalternatives.ca/bestworst2017). Her life’s work was recently summarized in a posthumous profile in Maclean’s In August, Kate posthumously received the Karen Takacs Award for Women’s Leadership in International Development, and in November she was recognized by the Women’s Executive Network as one of Canada’s Top 100™ Women.

Kate is survived by her son Rowan Salter, age 13, her former husband Mark Salter, PhD’99, her parents, innumerable friends and colleagues, and the women of Canada. Kate requested that donations be made to CCPA, where a fellowship in her name is being established as part of the Making Women Count initiative.

Kate’s moving final blog post can be read here: behindthenumbers.ca/2018/07/27/love-and-spreadsheets/.

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