Donald Watson Munro, BSF’51

Donald Watson MunroSeptember 4, 1923 ‑ October 13, 2013

Don spent his first 14 years in the Revelstoke area, where his lifelong love of the mountains and outdoors took root. In 1937 his family moved to Kamloops. After high school, Don enlisted with the Canadian Army. When WWII ended, Don resumed his education at UBC, where he met his future wife Anne in a UBC cafeteria when, in the midst of a food fight with pals, he accidentally struck her with a potato. Anne, who had already noticed the good‑looking, fun‑loving Don, arranged a blind date. They married in 1952 and settled in Nelson, where Don began his career with the BC Ministry of Forests. In 1955 they moved to Kamloops, where Don spent the balance of his career in private industry. Don pioneered industrial forestry in the interior of BC, contributing significantly to forest development, pulp mill raw material supply, and transportation systems. He initiated the export of chips from the southern interior and served on several industry committees. The Association of BC Forest Professionals awarded Don a lifetime membership – an honour given to individuals who have made an exemplary contribution to the profession.

One of Don’s great personal achievements was the creation of Tod Mountain (now Sun Peaks). He and a small circle of friends recognized the mountain’s potential as a ski hill. They planned it and had it operating by 1961. Don was the first president of Tod Mountain and took the inaugural ride on the “longest double chairlift in North America.” Don taught his kids and grandkids to ski and spent many years making tracks in Sun Peaks’ famous powder. Don is missed by his wife, Anne; children, Bruce (Jeannie), Sandra, BCom’78, (Jay), Linda (Paul), Bob (Lori); and eight grandchildren.

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